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Why some people bruise easier than others

Reduce your alcohol consumption, quit smoking and taking vitamin supplements may help bruises to heal more quickly.

When it comes to our bodies, we can thank our parents, grandparents, great-grandparents and so on for whatever strange bodily quirks we inherit. Some may win the genetic lottery and have smooth, even, flawless skin, while others may find themselves more likely to develop wrinkles, blemishes and other unwanted skin woes.

The same can be said for bruises – some of us are seemingly impervious to them, while others can expect big, black and blue marks from even the gentlest impact.

Unfortunately, as we get older, more and more of us tend to enter the latter category.

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"As we age, our skin loses a protective layer of fatty tissue under the skin," DRyan Harvey from House Call Doctor.

"In turn, this makes our blood vessels more likely to rupture if we suffer from a bump or fall. The result is more frequent bruising, that may also take longer to heal after the age of 60."

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Despite all over-60s being more prone to bruising with age, there are still certain factors which may indicate a higher risk.

"In our later years of life, bruising is often related to other health conditions," Harvey reveals. "For example, people on blood thinners and other medications may be more susceptible to bruising and haemorrhaging. Older patients who are a falls risk due to mobility issues may also sustain a greater number of bruises. Being aware of the health conditions that may lead to bruising will help people avoid painful lumps and bumps."

Thankfully, there are a number of steps we can all take to reduce our chances of developing bruises – or, at the very least, reduce their length and severity.

Aside from reducing alcohol consumption, quitting smoking and treating tissue and blood disorders, Harvey has one other suggestion. "Certain supplements may strengthen our bodies to promote better healing," he explains. "For example, taking a daily multivitamin may prevent vitamin deficiencies in older age and help bruises to heal more quickly."

- oversixty.com.au

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